Web 2.0 – a learning and teaching viewpoint

This is a talk by Scott Wilson from CETIS. So Web 2.0 ideas filter into eLearning 2.0.

eLearning 2.0 is about:
Going personal and global – relating to individuals, but on a global scale.
Symmetric relationships
Mashups and reuse – combining information from disparate sources, and reusing information in different contexts.

So, what processes make up eLearning?

Firstly Discovery:
Searching
Matching – match my requirements (e.g. online dating)
Building on previous achievements
Collaborative social filtering
Collaborative social intelligence
Fining a pathway to a future goal
Seredipity

When you look at this in a ‘2.0’ context. People start to combine (mashup) formal and informal learning episodes (e.g. joining a Yahoo group for discussion and taking a formal course)
People use shared goals to forge a social identity
The Long Tail – someone else, somewhere out there, will be interested in the same thing as you!

Aggregating opportunities:
Formal learning – prospectuses in XCRI format (need to investigate what this is – apparently ‘RSS for prospectus’)
Informal learning: 43Things, LiveJournal Communities, Flickr Groups, MeCanBe.
Compare how easy it is to join a topic on 43Things to applying to a course at a University.

Learning networks:
In the future will learners already be part of a learning network before joining a course? We already have at least one course that tries to do this (Business Information Systems) where prospective students can join the community of students and alumni before they start the course.

Creating and Sharing:
Writing (and photographing, drawing, filming, recording)
Developing a professional identity
Developing competence, confidence and independence
Going global for feedback

Again (not to blow our own trumpet), but this year at RHUL we had a course that included keeping a blog as part of the student assessment process (each student had a blog kept over the period of the course).

Collecting and Remixing – Pedagogy: How does pedagogic theory apply to these new concepts?
Constructivism – attenuating and labelling a subset of the knowledge environment; re-categorising a conception of the knowledge environment into a personal schema; synthesis (dialectic)
Connectivism – forming new connections and generating networks that extend the power of the individual; however, actional knowledge (learning) resides in the network, no necessarily the individual.

Scott is indicating that traditional VLE software makes all the activity ‘teacher designed’ (e.g. teacher setup a discussion group), as opposed to Learner self-organised activity (perhaps assumed that students do this themselves anyway). I wonder if this is actually fair enough – perhaps students should make use of Web 2.0 tools to organise themselves, as they would do (possibly) by going to the bar or coffee shop for a chat.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Web 2.0 – a learning and teaching viewpoint

This is a talk by Scott Wilson from CETIS. So Web 2.0 ideas filter into eLearning 2.0.

eLearning 2.0 is about:
Going personal and global – relating to individuals, but on a global scale.
Symmetric relationships
Mashups and reuse – combining information from disparate sources, and reusing information in different contexts.

So, what processes make up eLearning?

Firstly Discovery:
Searching
Matching – match my requirements (e.g. online dating)
Building on previous achievements
Collaborative social filtering
Collaborative social intelligence
Fining a pathway to a future goal
Seredipity

When you look at this in a ‘2.0’ context. People start to combine (mashup) formal and informal learning episodes (e.g. joining a Yahoo group for discussion and taking a formal course)
People use shared goals to forge a social identity
The Long Tail – someone else, somewhere out there, will be interested in the same thing as you!

Aggregating opportunities:
Formal learning – prospectuses in XCRI format (need to investigate what this is – apparently ‘RSS for prospectus’)
Informal learning: 43Things, LiveJournal Communities, Flickr Groups, MeCanBe.
Compare how easy it is to join a topic on 43Things to applying to a course at a University.

Learning networks:
In the future will learners already be part of a learning network before joining a course? We already have at least one course that tries to do this (Business Information Systems) where prospective students can join the community of students and alumni before they start the course.

Creating and Sharing:
Writing (and photographing, drawing, filming, recording)
Developing a professional identity
Developing competence, confidence and independence
Going global for feedback

Again (not to blow our own trumpet), but this year at RHUL we had a course that included keeping a blog as part of the student assessment process (each student had a blog kept over the period of the course).

Collecting and Remixing – Pedagogy: How does pedagogic theory apply to these new concepts?
Constructivism – attenuating and labelling a subset of the knowledge environment; re-categorising a conception of the knowledge environment into a personal schema; synthesis (dialectic)
Connectivism – forming new connections and generating networks that extend the power of the individual; however, actional knowledge (learning) resides in the network, no necessarily the individual.

Scott is indicating that traditional VLE software makes all the activity ‘teacher designed’ (e.g. teacher setup a discussion group), as opposed to Learner self-organised activity (perhaps assumed that students do this themselves anyway). I wonder if this is actually fair enough – perhaps students should make use of Web 2.0 tools to organise themselves, as they would do (possibly) by going to the bar or coffee shop for a chat.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *